News | Risk

August 2021 — Tensions Run High and Other Top News in the Security and Risk Industry

By Daniel Young | September 2, 2021 | 5 min read
Industry news aug

Chain Mail-Inspired Smart Fabric Turns Rigid Under Pressure

From Nerdist: Researchers at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University and Caltech in the U.S. have invented a new chain mail-esque smart fabric. Assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Nanyang Tech, Wang Yifan, led the team. Together the scientists aimed to demonstrate the viability of “structured fabrics” consisting of “three-dimensional particles” arranged into layered chain mails. In essence, they were investigating smart fabrics with individual interlocking pieces that can change their shape but maintain rigidity.

Our take: That’s right: chain mail is back, and not just for people who go to renaissance faires. This new smart fabric, which interlocks and hardens under pressure, could be a game changer for the security industry. It’s light, flexible and may protect the wearer from not only bullets, but also knives.

Off-duty Pawtucket police officer pleads not guilty to charges in shooting of teenager

WJAR: An off-duty Pawtucket police officer charged in the shooting of an 18-year-old in West Greenwich was arraigned Friday and released on personal recognizance. Officer Daniel Dolan pleaded not guilty in Kent County Superior Court to three counts of assault with a dangerous weapon and one count of discharging a firearm in a crime of violence. According to an investigation, Dolan was returning from a detail assignment on the evening of June 23 when he encountered an Audi sedan on Interstate 95 in West Greenwich. The vehicles exited the highway and Dolan tried to detain the driver of the Audi outside a pizza shop. When the operator of the Audi tried to drive away, Dolan fired one round from his service weapon, striking the driver in the arm.

Our take: It’s hard to blame the teenagers for driving away. Dolan was off-duty, and in an unmarked vehicle; to most kids, it would seem like a dangerous man was trying to get them out of their car. The fact that the teens drove off, however, doesn’t excuse Dolan from shooting them — as a peace officer concerned about reckless driving, he should have taken their license plate number down and either gotten in touch with their parents or at worst, reported them to his on-duty colleagues.

Mich. man sentenced to prison for vandalizing, shooting at Black neighbor’s home


From The Grio: A white Michigan man has been sentenced to four to 10 years in prison after being convicted of harassing a Black family because he didn’t like the Black Lives Matter sign they had in their window. The incident occurred in Warren, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. Michael Frederick Jr. admitted to harassing Eddie and Candace Hall in September 2020. He pleaded no contest to ethnic intimidation, discharging a firearm at a building, using a firearm during a felony and malicious destruction of property.

Our take: Our country is deeply divided right now, and every organization should be aware that this sort of violence — attacking people because of signs representing their beliefs — is going to get worse before it gets better. Take proper precautions to protect your people and property and be sure to take every threat and security concern seriously.

Threats from Anti-Vaxxers At Public Meetings In California

From the Late Show with Stephen Colbert: The public comments at a meeting of the San Diego Board of Supervisors got concerning when anti-vaxxers took the mic to blame the planet Saturn for COVID-19, sing showtunes, call the Board of Supervisors redcoats and Nazis, and scream furiously into the microphone about vaccines.

Our take: Although the display at this particular meeting was comical at times, the underlying sentiments were not, and some of the commenters were downright threatening. Tensions are running high at many school board and town hall meetings. Public boards should maintain a police presence at public meetings and must take any threats seriously during public comments.

Holly, Mich. standoff that ended with 1 dead, 1 in custody, started with carjacking


From The Detroit News: A standoff that ended at a Holly home early Wednesday, August 25 started with one carjacking in Kentucky and two other attempts in Monroe County, including from a grandmother in a hotel parking lot, authorities say. The suspects, a man and a woman, reportedly crashed a vehicle in a yard at a Holly residence and stormed inside, Michigan State Police tweeted Tuesday. The female suspect surrendered to authorities before midnight. A bomb squad robot later sent into the house revealed the male suspect was dead inside. An autopsy Wednesday determined William C. Lanham, 39, of Lebanon, Kentucky, died from a single gunshot wound to the head. The death was ruled a suicide, a spokesman said.

Our take: Active shooters have returned with a vengeance after lockdown, but in this particular instance we don’t just want to focus on the shooter himself. Instead, we want to talk about media coverage. There are stories about the incident online now, but at the time, the only way we could learn about it was through posts on social media. The news industry has suffered lately, causing media blackouts in smaller towns and cities and so it’s often difficult to find out what’s going on locally. Social media, for better or worse, is filling that void. Circadian Risk hopes to help our customers get better informed by building APIs that integrate with social media to help you understand what’s happening in the area around your sites.

August top grants


Fiscal Year 2021 Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA): The Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) program makes federal funds available to states, U.S. territories, federally recognized tribal governments, and local communities to reduce or eliminate the risk of repetitive flood damage to buildings and structures insured under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). It does so with a recognition of the growing flood hazards associated with climate change1, and of the need for flood hazard risk mitigation activities that promote climate adaptation and resilience with respect to flooding. These include both acute extreme weather events and chronic stressors which have been observed and are expected to increase in the future. Grant closes: Jan. 28 2022

Fiscal Year 2021 Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC): The Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program makes federal funds available to states, U.S territories, federally recognized tribal governments, and local communities for hazard mitigation activities. It does so with a recognition of the growing hazards associated with climate change1, and of the need for natural hazard risk mitigation activities that promote climate adaptation and resilience with respect to those hazards. These include both acute extreme weather events and chronic stressors which have been observed and are expected to increase in the future. Grant closes: Jan. 28, 2022

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